On Being A Good Friend

I have a very good friend (and I hope she thinks the same of me).  Her name is Sheridan.

We have a kind of magic together:  we have a lot of interests in common and do “day road trips” to bead fairs, fabric stores, yarn shops and such, because we share craft hobbies and help each other with our projects.  The other day, she just showed up when I was on the air to give me some buttons she’d bought for a tote project gift I was working on.  With the buttons came a card which showed an old photo of two women friends on a couch.  Underneath the photo, the caption read:  “A good friend will bail you out of jail.  A GREAT friend is one who sits beside you and says ‘Wow, that was fun!’”

I couldn’t stop laughing when I read that, and while you should not take that literally, it does suggest that friends really get into each other in a special way. Friends want to experience each other’s joys and heartaches as part of bonding with and mending each other.

I have watched Sheridan put herself out for me, stand up for me, and bend over backwards to make me happy.  I am one lucky woman to have such a blessing in my life.  Friends – really good friends – are a rare commodity:  you have to have just the right chemistry, attitude, understanding, forgiveness, openness, kindness, and thoughtfulness.  A good friend brings all that out in you.  A good friend makes you a better person.

I’m sure we’ve irritated each other from time to time, but we’ve never had a fight about it.  Why not?  Because good friends have each other’s best interests at heart and accept each other’s quirks with humor.

The best way to have a good friend is also the best way to have a good  marriage: choose wisely, and treat kindly.

And consider yourself very fortunate if you have someone who resonates with you in this lifetime.

Sheridan, I love ya girl!