Category Archives: China

Olympics, Chinese Style

“Beijing officials have distributed 4.3 million copies of an etiquette book, outlining rules on good manners and foreign customs, including rules about what not to wear,” according to The Wall Street Journal (8/1/08)  “Among the no-nos:  more than three color shades in an outfit, white socks with black shoes, and pajamas and slippers in public.”   It should be interesting for the Chinese citizens who obey these rules to see the foreigners in sweat pants, jeans and flip-flops.

Another issue for the Chinese government is the crackdown on any protesting during the Olympics.  China just doesn’t want to look bad to the almost half-million tourists who are there for the festivities.  According to the Associated Press, probably several thousand Chinese protestors have already been locked up for the duration so they don’t behave “inappropriately.”  Also, protestors had to apply for permission to demonstrate some five days in advance and had to acknowledge that they would not harm national interests.  They were supposed to be relegated to one of three parks which are several miles from the main Olympic stadium, but in a report on Saturday, August 8 in the Los Angeles Times, the three parks where demonstrators were to be allowed were totally quiet.  There were no signs of protest areas or of protesters, and, according to the Times,  there were more security personnel than visitors at the parks.  Foreigners who protested over the past week were deported, and the heavy security measures have forced most of the demonstrations to be held in other countries, including Tibet, India, Hong Kong, England, France, and Germany.

Who Picked China for the Olympics?

Being able to breathe seems to be a high priority for Olympic athletes – and in Beijing, that’s going to be a bit of a challenge.  However, according to Associated Press sources, China is working hard at it….cough…cough.

Last week, Beijing’s air pollution index dropped to 44 from its more typical number which is double that.  A reading below 50 is considered “good,” and between 51 and 100 is “moderate,” but “moderate” is still above the World Heath Organization’s guidelines for healthy air.

Their polluted air has prompted the government to begin drastic measures, including the halting of most construction, the closing of machinery, chemical and construction factories, and the imposition of restrictions on half the city’s 3.3 million vehicles. 

Many of the 10,500 Olympic athletes are heading to South Korea, Japan and other places to avoid Beijing’s air for as long as possible.  This is a kind of “reverse doping,” as the impact of the city’s pollution on the health and performance of these athletes is in question.

Yet another risk is that of Islamic terrorism.  Some of you have been led to believe that jihadism is a reaction or reasonable payback to America and her friends for being bad, bad places.  So it might seem strange to you to find out that a Muslim group, claiming responsibility for a series of explosions in Chinese cities, is allegedly planning to attack the Beijing Olympic Games. According to the AP, “earlier this year, the Chinese Ministry of Public Security said it had disrupted two plots to attack the Olympics.  It claimed one group had been planning to kidnap athletes, foreign journalists, and other visitors, while a second had been manufacturing explosives and was plotting to attack hotels, government offices, and military targets in Shanghai, Beijing, and other cities….”  Just yesterday we heard about sixteen Chinese policemen who were killed in an attack on a border post in the Muslim region of Xinjiang.

As if that were not enough, the Chinese government was planning to censor the  Internet during the games.  Reporters already in Beijing have been unable to access scores of web pages – particularly politically sensitive ones that discuss Tibetan succession and Taiwanese independence, as well as the sites of Amnesty International, Radio Free Asia and several Hong Kong newspapers.

Oh, you should know that the International Olympic Committee quietly agreed to the Internet limitations…that is, the blocking of sites that were not Games-related.  There was such an uproarfrom other countries, however, that China has backed off on this deal, and on Friday, the Chinese government announced that it will not censor the Internet during the competition.

In 2001, when China won the right to host the Games, it made the commitment that it would improve its record on human rights and provide athletes with clean air.  Without Friday’s announcement (made only because of outside pressure), that would have made the score zero for two.

China and the Value of Children

China has a population control policy of one child per couple.  To encourage families to comply, population planning authorities have regularly been giving parents in rural areas amounts ranging from $8 to $17 annually for 18 years, and $144 after the parents reach 60.  Because so many children  died in the recent Sichuan earthquake, the Chinese government has decided to drop the 60 year old age requirement and will compensate the families now.

China has a limited pension and health care system, so parents expect to have a heavy financial dependence on their offspring during their elder years.  For the families whose sole children died, this support is now gone, although the government has permitted these families to adopt.

Recently, there were angry marches in which parents protested the shoddy school buildings in which their children died.  In some cases, the schools were the only buildings to completely collapse, according to Mei Fong, a journalist from Chengdu, China.

According to some news reports, the government is considering extra compensation after authorities have concluded investigations to decide the extent of negligence in the collapse of the school buildings following the quake.

Sharon Stone and China

I remember several “brouhahas” over the last few years concerning some Christian religious leaders making comments about severe weather, HIV and even September 11, suggesting that it was “God’s punishment” for perceived flaws in American social life.  Boy, oh boy, did the media go mad over that!

Although she has had to backtrack and apologize for her comments, I didn’t see anywhere near the same response to Sharon Stone’s suggestion that China’s devastating earthquakes, which killed an enormous population might be “karma,” because China is “not nice to Tibetans.”  First of all, the average Chinese person has no power to dictate foreign concerns, much less their own domestic situation.  Has anybody lately looked at their form of government?  Anyone whining about “disenfranchisement” of voting privileges in America should visit China for a year – and make sure that the 50% of deployed military’s ballots are actually counted for a change.

To suggest that God or karma wiped out innocent people, because He is unhappy with their government’s international political position is, in my never to be humble opinion, blasphemous, and phenomenally insensitive and disgusting.

Christian Dior has dropped spokeswoman Stone from their advertisements in China, and has also apologized to its customers there. But, I imagine, because she is a popular, liberal, Hollywood type, with great facial bone structure, she will not be feeling the negative impact of her own “karma” for very long.

Don’t Buy Your Kids Toys from China This Season

As we head into Thanksgiving, and the beginning of the biggest shopping season of the year, it’s time to take a stand regarding the kind of toys we buy our kids.  Case in point:

1. Mattell, Inc. recalled 675,000 Barbie® Accessory toys because the paint on the surface of the accessories contained excessive levels of lead.  Lead can cause learning and behavior problems and even death.

2. The Consumer Product Safety Commission recalled roughly 4 million arts and crafts toys called Aqua Dots because several children in the United States and Australia were hospitalized after swallowing some of the toy’s beads.  The beads had a chemical coating that evidently was related to GHB, the “date rape” drug.

3. An additional 175,000 Curious George plush dolls made by Marvel Toys were recalled because of lead on the toys’ plastic faces.

This past summer, the toy industry recalled more than 22 million toys because of serious danger issues.  The common denominator seems to be that all these toys are made in China.  China is the world’s number one producer of toys, due to cheap labor and manufacturing costs.  While the world’s governments lazily deal with tougher controls to intercept dangerous toys before they hurt our children, how about we parents taking control and only purchasing toys made in the U.S.A. this holiday season?  We should be supporting our own economy anyway.

If you don’t know how to find toys made in the USA, here’s a start – a parent single-handedly took up the charge and created a website that links to USA-made toys.  toysmadeinamerica.com/.

If you want detailed information on toys that have been recalled by the US Consumer Product Safety Commission, you can find a list of all the latest recalls at http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/category/toy.html.